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Jan
04

Content Marketing That Works in 2013 – It Takes a Village?

Content Marketing That Works in 2013 – Key Sources Say You’ll Need to Revamp Your Organization in 2013 to Meet Content and Social Media Marketing Demands

There is no doubt, as we sail ahead into the uncharted waters that are 2013, content marketing is one of the key marketing strategies we’ll take

Consumers will part with their hard earned greenbacks, but these days, increasingly, they want to be part of the equation. Your key to making that happen is a solid content and social media marketing strategy. More than ever, that takes a team approach, whether that team is staffers, third parties, or both.

with us from 2012. Content marketing is one of the key inbound marketing pieces. Organizations are finding they can’t live without it. As consumers look more to brands for information, entertainment, and clarity, effective content creation and  management will become more critical than ever… and you’ll need the right people in place to ensure it comes off without a hitch.

Consumers, They Always Demand More of……

The kind of content consumers will demand in the new year encompass more than just a single mode. You’ll be expected to produce text, audio, video, and graphics, do them well, then promote and distribute them in a variety of ways.

Vital, If Your Organization Wants Content Marketing That Works in 2013

If you want your content to do what it’s tasked with; get your organization noticed, engage consumers, and drive sales, your content creators will be forced to deliver compelling, high value content. If your content is done right, it does one or more of the following, and does it very well:

  • Helps solve key problems
  • Entertains
  • Enlightens
  • Reveals

For most organizations, that means one thing. It’s going to require more resources allocated to content creation this year. If your content marketing strategy had been posting to your blog a couple of times per month and hoping for the best, prepare to turn up the heat. Your audience isn’t going to accept that any longer.

Great Expectations

As consumer expectations grow, they want their content more closely tailored to their specific needs. In addition, different individuals absorb information more effectively in different ways. Some are visual learners, while others are auditory learners. Producing content to account for those differences builds all-important value.

Also, different content lends itself to different kinds of formats. Instructional material on how to install a new hard drive is probably more effective as video, while conceptual content on cloud computing can be highly effective as text and graphics.

No matter the content mix, your target consumers are hungry for content that presses their buttons like a 12 year old hammers on an XBOX. If your content doesn’t meet their expectations, they’ll go elsewhere in search of some that does.

Remember, it’s not just about attracting new consumers, although that’s certainly something most brands are focused on. It’s engaging them and building long term relationships. That’s what really brings home the bacon for your business.

How Do We Know That?

Well, past experience, for one thing, but it doesn’t stop there….

According to Trendwatching.com’s new report, 10 Crucial Consumer Trends for 2013  consumers are going to expect brands they follow to proactively engage them and deliver content that helps them do things better, solve problems and help them save their hard earned money. Whether that’s the tail wagging the dog or not, it’s certainly a far cry from the model most marketers are used to.

What’s more, consumers want, well more. Transparent information, especially. They’ll demand revelation and expect no surprises of the negative kind from their favorite brands. Content will be key to ensuring those expectations are met, if not exceeded.

Tweet, Tweet…. and That’s Just the Beginning

Then, of course, you’ve got social media. If there’s one thing that eats content like Godzilla munches ’72 Corollas, it’s social media. Brands now realize that they need segmented, optimized social media campaigns to support their various marketing initiatives. That means adding social media marketers to their staff, or finding trusted third-party providers to handle these tasks. It only makes sense. Keeping up with the planning, production, and management actually leaves little choice.

Yet Another Indispensable Marketing Staffer…

All that content needs direction. Just throwing it against the wall and hoping something sticks isn’t going to generate the kind of ROI most organizations are looking for. That’s why the Mathew Knell, AOL’s Social Media Director wrote in the Huffington Post today that one position many organizations are scrambling to add to their staffs this year is a dedicated Content Strategist.

I’ve posted it here before. All the content in the world does little good without good strategic planning. Creating such a plan, executing it, and following through is vital, but often neglected. Yes, it’s damned hard work. So much in fact, that just relying on someone on your marketing department to do it in their spare time just doesn’t cut it any more.

Are you starting to get the feeling that you’ll be planning, producing and publishing more content, in more varieties, and managing it more this year? Well, you’re right…. if you want to grow your reach and build your brand.

That means one thing; committing more resources. Businesses are adding staff or turning to external providers for content creation and management. They’re using more tools to keep everything moving ahead on the straight and narrow. Start building now, because as the year moves ahead, your content and social media marketing village is going to become a busy place, indeed.

You know the drll… please share to LinkedIn, FB, and Tweet with the helpful, little icons, Thanks!

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